TV Causes Alzheimer’s Disease

That got your attention!

You may be wondering, “is she saying that watching TV causes brain damage?” Well, not exactly (but I’m not saying it doesn’t, either).

After years of studying what actually causes cognitive decline, research shows that a number of lifestyle choices have an impact on the development of degenerative brain diseases, like Alzheimer’s Disease. The big question, to me, is why do we make these lifestyle choices in the first place?

The answer, in large part, has to do with information we derive from watching television.

We may laugh about it, but the phrase “AS SEEN ON TV” remains a powerful reminder of just how ingrained the veracity of anything ingested from that medium is regarded in the minds of the American public.

Commercials shown on broadcast TV in the 60s and 70s revealed a desirable life filled with modern conveniences, including delicious, easy-to-prepare foods and marvelous labor-saving devices. The American Dream as I knew it was shown in vivid detail, in living color, on the ever-illuminated 19 inch screen in my family living room.

A diet rich in high fructose corn syrup, sodium and preservatives was tantalizingly promoted by the marketing geniuses of the day.

My loving parents demonstrated their deep affection for their family by providing the kinds of foods that were portrayed in those glowing scenarios. It never occurred to us that Madison Avenue had anything nefarious in mind. They showed us what we had to have, and we dutifully went out and filled our shopping carts with these yummy, brightly packaged consumables.

Some red flags went up when I was in the fifth grade and the school nurse called my mother in for a conference regarding my weight. I was a fat kid. I needed to go on a diet when I was 10.  I was introduced to calorie counting and cyclamates. One of the worst days of my young life was when cyclamates were banned for being carcinogenic. I had really enjoyed the foods that were flavored with those less-than-wholesome substances. Other sugar substitutes came along (aspartame and sucralose) to take their place in my dietary lexicon. After all, how enjoyable is life without diet soda?

I have fought weight gain my entire life. My quest for health has lead me to embrace more physical activity and a diet that goes against everything that constituted “normalcy” in my childhood. And this direction has developed as a direct result of having witnessed both my parents’ sad endings.

My father suffered myriad illnesses that had to do with his smoking (another habit promoted by Madison Avenue in an earlier time), consuming processed foods and not getting much exercise. He succumbed to congestive heart failure and vascular dementia, among many other things. He died at 76.

My mother, who had Type 2 diabetes, high cholesterol and high blood pressure developed dementia with psychosis and died at 86.

Everyone dies. But the suffering endured by my parents, and their descent into dementia was prompted by their diet and lifestyle. Understand, I am not blaming them. They were pursuing the American Dream, as seen on television. Nobody told them how the story would end for them. And I don’t know how differently they might have departed had they known what I have since learned.

I do know that food is medicine (or poison). What we consume plays an enormous role in how our bodies repair themselves and how we age. We don’t have to develop dementia. We can have some impact on how we mature. Unfortunately, the makers of the stuff that’s actually good for us don’t have a whole lot of money to advertise to us. They’re too busy struggling to make a living. So instead of leading a life that incorporates healthful food and smarter lifestyle choices, if we watch TV, we’ll be shown commercials promoting drugs that address the symptoms garnered by consumption of “convenience foods” packed with preservatives and chemically-derived flavor enhancers. And we’ll think of these as “normal.”

If you “ask your doctor,” as the commercial voiceovers suggest, they will likely confirm what you see on the screen, because they are taught to treat symptoms. The medical school curriculum does not include nutrition. They learn about conditions and how to treat them with drugs and procedures. Root causes are not discussed.

So, if you have concerns about your health, get outside. Move. Eat more vegetables and fruits. Avoid sugary drinks. Read books. I can recommend a few if you like.

And turn off the TV. That’s probably one of the single best things you can do to prevent Alzheimer’s.

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Shaken and Stirred

Teaching is a pursuit I really enjoy. Creating syllabi, designing presentations, setting the pace and structure for the instillation of concepts are all fun for me. I have a lot of information to share, and having the opportunity to disseminate what I know to enthusiastic seekers is a privilege.

This year, at Bergen Community College, through the Institute for Learning in Retirement, I am conducting a course called Dementia Sucks: The Class.” My book is the basis for the material, but I’ve gained a great deal of new insights since the book’s publication, and I’m eager to share them.

While I’ve delivered a number of classes and talks on this subject matter before, I have to admit this session was a little unsettling for me. I like to ask attendees why they come to my talks to ensure that I hit on topics people really want covered. This time, I got a surprise.

Two of the eleven students in attendance had been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease. This was a first for me. I am accustomed to speaking to people who are caregivers, or who are in the red zone for becoming caregivers. One gentleman was accompanied by his wife. The other was still high functioning enough to drive and conduct an independent life, but he was clear that he had this dire diagnosis and wanted to learn all he could while he could.

The way I structured the course, the first class was designated to introduce my qualifications, define dementia and outline the most important considerations for potential caregivers and potential dementia sufferers before the worst happened. The second class was about preparation and the third was about surviving. And I promised that in the last session, I would be discussing the latest exciting research and suggesting resources.

I had to gently change up my approach, because I didn’t want to upset the folks who were already in the grasp of this dreaded disease. And their situation is more urgent. Waiting to take action is particularly dangerous for them.

Something Substantial to Offer

In the last few weeks I have been lead by several different people to look at “The End of Alzheimer’s” by Dr. Dale Bredesen. I had noticed this book at my library recently, but I was in the middle of another book on the subject, so I passed it up.

Then I got followed by someone on Instagram whose handle is “Alzheimer’s Has Been Reversed.” I didn’t pay much attention, because I thought it was probably a scam of some sort.

At a business seminar, I spoke with a wellness coach following his talk. He suggested I read Dr. Bredesen’s book.

And then, leaving a business expo in New York I met another wellness coach. We actually had dinner together and she recommended the book.

Looking more closely at the Instagram message I’d initially disregarded, it was, in fact, about Dr. Bredesen’s work!

So I went back to my library, found the book and took it home. Apparently, everything I believed to be true about Alzheimer’s Disease, that it was caused by a variety of ailments and could be treated, successfully, with lifestyle changes, better nutrition, supplements, exercise and meditation, was empirically documented.

I don’t know anyone personally who has benefited from Dr. Bredesen’s protocol, but the reputable sources validating the work made it clear that it is legitimate. I emailed a link to my student (the independent gentleman) suggesting he investigate further.

The universe is miraculous, and I am grateful to be witness to this incredibly important development. I suspect the mainstream media will not be announcing this discovery anytime soon. There’s too much money to be derived from advertising the ineffective drugs that don’t work, and all the expensive ancillary services that reap profits from the misery of others.

It is my sincere hope, that while the rest of the world shakes their head over the latest political affront, that we will quietly guide those in need to this non-medical solution to a hideous epidemic and solve it before millions more succumb.

And I’m happy to do it, three to twelve students at a time if need be.